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Plants that Attract Beneficial Arthropods

Plants that Attract Beneficial Arthropods:

a list of plants documented to attract natural enemies of pests

 

 Ana Legrand

Integrated Pest Management Program

University of Connecticut

 

 

 

Plant Family

 

 

 

Plant Common Name

 

 

Scientific Name

 

Resources for Beneficials

 

Beneficials Attracted

Asteraceae (Compositae, Aster family)

 

Common yarrow

 

Achillea millefolium

‘Sunny Seduction’, ‘Pink grapefruit’, ‘Pomegranate’, and      other cultivars.

 

nectar, overwintering site

 

Hover flies, parasitoids Overwintering habitat for spiders.

 

 

 

Cornflower or Bachelor’s buttons

 

Centaurea cyanus

 

nectar, pollen, extrafloral nectar

 

Hover flies, hymenopteran parasitoids, lacewings, predaceous wasps

 

 

 

Chicory

 

Cichorium intybus

 

nectar, pollen, overwintering site

 

Hover flies, overwintering spiders

 

 

 

Common Sunflower

 

Helianthus annuus

 

nectar, pollen

 

Predators and parasitoids

 

 

 

Camphorweed

 

Heterotheca subaxillaris

 

nectar

 

Tachinid and hover flies, lacewings, ladybird beetles, hymenopteran parasitoids

 

 

 

Ornamental goldenrold

 

 

Solidago cutleri ‘Goldrush’

 

nectar, pollen

 

Hover flies, parasitoids

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goldenrod

 

Solidago spp.

 

nectar, pollen

 

Robber flies, assassin bugs, spiders, big-eyed bugs, ladybird beetles and other predatory beetles.

 

 

 

Tansy

 

Tanacetum vulgare

 

nectar, pollen, overwintering site

 

Hover flies, spiders

 

Apiaceae (Umbelliferae or carrot family)

 

Sweet fennel

 

Foeniculum vulgare

var. dulce

 

 

nectar

 

Hover flies, many species of parasitoids including Edovum puttleri and Pediobius foveolatus.

 

 

 

Dill

 

Anethum graveolens

 

nectar

 

Hover flies, lacewings, pink spotted ladybird beetle, Edovum puttleri and Pediobius foveolatus.

 

 

 

Wild carrot or Queen Anne’s lace

 

Daucus carota

 

nectar, overwintering site

 

Hover flies, Tiphia parasitoid wasps, ladybirds beetles including the seven-spotted ladybird beetle, several parasitoid and predatory wasps, lacewings and minute pirate bugs. Overwintering habitat for spiders.  

 

 

 

Coriander (cilantro)

 

Coriandrum sativum

 

nectar

 

Hover flies, parasitoid tachinid flies, lacewings, pink spotted ladybird beetle, Pediobius foveolatus parasitoids.

 

 

 

Garden Angelica

 

 

Angelica archangelica

 

nectar

 

Ladybird beetles, lacewings, hover flies

 

 

Purple-stemmed Angelica

 

 

Angelica atropurpurea

 

nectar

 

Several species of parasitoids, ladybird beetles. Plant is suggested for use in rain gardens.

 

Boraginaceae

(Borage family)

 

Borage

 

Borago officinalis

 

nectar, pollen, egg-laying site for lacewings

 

Ground beetles, predatory nabid bugs, hover flies, lacewings, spiders

 

 

 

             

             

 

Phacelia

Phacelia tanacetifolia

nectar, pollen, egg-laying site for lacewings

Lacewings, spiders, hoverflies

 

Paeoniaceae

 

Peony

 

Paeonia lactiflora

‘Festiva Maxima’

‘Sarah Bernhardt’

‘Bowl of Beauty’

‘Big Ben’

 

extrafloral nectar in early spring before flower buds open

 

Spring Tiphia and other hymenopteran parasitoids, seven-spotted ladybird beetles

 

Brassicaceae

 

Sweet alyssum or carpet flower

 

Lobularia maritima

nectar

 

Hover flies, parasitoids

 

Fabaceae (Pea family)

 

Garden lupine

 

Lupinus polyphyllus

 

egg-laying site for lacewings

 

Lacewings

 

 

 

References

Bugg, R., R. Colfer, W. Chaney, H. Smith and J. Cannon. 2008. Flower flies (Syrphidae) and other biological control agents for aphids in vegetable crops. University of California, Publication 8285.

Landis, D.A., S.D. Wratten, and G. M. Gurr. 2000. Habitat management to conserve natural enemies of arthropod pests in agriculture. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 45:175-201.

Legrand, A. 2009a. Evaluation of ornamental plants as nectar sources for summer Tiphia. p. 77-79.  In K. Guillard (ed), 2009 Annual Turfgrass Research Report, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources,  University of Connecticut.

Legrand, A. 2009b. Evaluation of landscape ornamental plants as nectar plants for Tiphia vernalis and as host plants for pest scarab beetles.  p. 73-76. In K. Guillard (ed), 2009 Annual Turfgrass Research Report, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources,  University of Connecticut.

Legrand, A. 2010. Evaluation of landscape ornamental and herb plants as nectar sources for Tiphia parasitoid wasps. In K. Guillard (ed), 2010 Annual Turfgrass Research Report, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut.

Patt, J. M., G.C. Hamilton and J.H. Lashomb. 1997. Foraging success of parasitoid wasps on flowers: interplay of insect morphology, floral architecture and searching behavior. Ent. Exp. Appl. 83: 21-30.

Picket, C. and R. Bugg, eds. 1998. Enhancing biological control: habitat management to promote natural enemies of agricultural pests. University of California Press.

Prepared by Ana Legrand, Assistant Extension Professor, updated March 2014.

The information in this document is for educational purposes only.  The recommendations contained are based on the best available knowledge at the time of publication.  Any reference to commercial products, trade or brand names is for information only, and no endorsement or approval is intended. The Cooperative Extension System does not guarantee or warrant the standard of any product referenced or imply approval of the product to the exclusion of others which also may be available.  The University of Connecticut, Cooperative Extension System, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is an equal opportunity program provider and employer.

 

 



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